Wine Data Success = Qualitative + Quantitative Analysis

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“We stand on the shoulders of those who came before us.”

I don’t know who said that originally, but it’s been on my mind these past few weeks as I’ve had the chance to see how quantitative data analysis – which is Enolytics’ focus – complements and adds onto qualitative data analysis.

It’s worth taking a moment to pause here, and underscore what this means.

For many decades now, the wine industry has relied on qualitative research, like surveys and focus groups and in-person, face-to-face interviews.

This style of research is incredibly valuable, and it’s grounded in well-established, well-executed social science. There’s a reason why so many research efforts, and so many decisions in our industry have long been based on these methods of analysis.

I respect that. Our team respects that. It’s foundational, and we value the ongoing contributions it makes.

What we also value is that, today, there’s a flip side of the coin, and that’s the quantitative research that is our focus. Big data is possible because of technology, and because millions of consumers around the world are telling us, in an objective way and digitally, what they think and how they feel about wine, every moment of every day.

We respect that too, especially as we continue to grow and explore and are presented with opportunities to see how the quantitative style of analysis can dynamically interact with the qualitative style. How they reflect each other. How they build upon each other. How they differ. Where the breaks are, and what the limitations and advantages are of each side of the break.

Quantitative data, as a first step, could help us to figure out the what: what consumers consider to be your competitive set, for example, and what kind of traction you’re seeing in markets from New York to Chicago to Los Angeles. It helps you to see the problem areas, and also what questions to ask.

Qualitative data, subsequently, could help us to figure out the why: why consumers in Cincinnati are raving about your chardonnay, and why interest in your pinot has dropped in Houston.

Does that make sense?

It’s an exciting intersection of collaboration, and we’re psyched to be part of it. Personally, I’m psyched to share more with you in the coming weeks about the hands-on practicalities of this.

These are opportunities to build bridges between how things have always been done, and how they can be complemented by new layers and common points of engagement.

If you find yourself comfortable in the “how things have always been done” part, we get it. And we aren’t suggesting you abandon it. We are suggesting that there are ways to add on, a step at a time, that can also be within your comfort zone.

Let’s take the first steps. Please be in touch, and let me know what’s on your mind.

Thank you, as always, for reading.