South Africa

I Asked for Your Help, and Here’s What Happened: A "Scarily Accurate" Recap from Cape Town, South Africa

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I felt a little bit like a carrier pigeon.

Standing in front of the audience, that is, at the Business of Wine and Food Tourism Conference in South Africa last week, held at Spier Wine Farm in Stellenbosch. I was honored to deliver the keynote, where I focused on two things: how we can use data to improve tourism in wine and food, and learnings from last year’s California wildfires, particularly in Sonoma.

This community — you — responded with an outpouring of suggestions, so much so that I felt like that carrier pigeon, full of information, flying across hemispheres.

Shout outs here (and there!) to Honore Comfort of the Wine Business Institute at Sonoma State University, Sandra Hess of DTC Wine Workshops, Michael Longerbeam and Sara Rathbun at Dry Creek Vineyard, David Gluzman at the Global Wine Database, and the team at 3x3 Insights in New York.

Thank you.

Mainly I spoke about data, and how our work at Enolytics — bolstered by our ecosystem of data partners — can be useful for increasing business in the areas of wine and food tourism. I’d like to focus this week on one very significant takeaway that I heard in response to the presentation, immediately afterward and in the time since.

“There’s a big gap between data and how to use it.”

We all have data. Actually, we have tons and tons of data. But, as a delegate from the audience admitted, he never looks at it. It’s just spreadsheets that he receives day in and day out. There’s no interpretation or “translation” or application to the work that’s in front of him to do.

That’s the gap, and it’s a big problem when data is just numbers. What does it mean? More importantly, what does it mean for you, and your work, and achieving the goals that you are working toward?

Answering those questions is what we do.

We interpret it in a way that, as another delegate and winemaker tweeted, is “scarily accurate” for the reality of wine.

Could you use some help on this front? Do you have data that you know is valuable in some way, but are having a hard time seeing the forest for the trees?

That’s what we do, and we’re here to help. Drop me a line anytime, at cathy@enolytics.com or +1.702.528.3717.

I look forward to hearing from you, and thank you as always for reading —

Cathy

If We Didn't Collaborate, We Wouldn't Have a Reason to Exist

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Let me start with Thanks.

Last week I asked for your feedback and input on data sources in the areas of wine and food tourism, in advance of the keynote I’m giving in a few weeks in Cape Town. And boy, did you deliver! It’s incredibly exciting to flesh out the presentation with hands-on learnings from fresh sources and efforts in parts of the world that, frankly, were brand new to me.

So thank you, sincerely.

That example sets the stage perfectly for what I’d like to focus on this week, and it has to do with collaboration.

If we didn’t collaborate, we wouldn’t have a reason to exist.

That’s because the true definition of a big data company is to aggregate multiple sources of data across multiple platforms. For us that means building out an ecosystem of data partners who each deliver raw data that’s useful for our clients. In some cases it’s a winery’s own data that’s one of the sources.

As I said, it’s about collaboration.

In practice, and in a very simplified sense, this is how it works.

  1. Listen to the client. Understand intimately the area of research.

  2. Draft a scope of work.

  3. Iterate the scope, from both sides, in order to extract maximum value and to clarify expectations.

  4. Execute the scope of work.

  5. Enolytics delivers the results, via Webinar or in person

  6. Give the client time to process the results, within their own framework for business and at their own pace.

  7. Client asks follow up questions.

  8. Enolytics responds.

  9. Repeat steps 7 and 8 till the area of scoped research is well understood.

Want to see how this looks, from the perspective of our clients? Please have a look at our revised Press page for their opinions in their own words.

Here’s what’s important to understand: Collaboration isn’t a one-time interaction. It’s a partnership, back and forth, over a fairly long period of time with a lot of touchpoints.

Yes, we’ll get to know each other personally. Yes, we’ll explore ideas that will be new on all sides. And yes, both of our businesses will grow in the process.

How can we help you grow? What ideas have been percolating, that you’re ready to move on?

We’re here and ready to respond, collaboratively.

Thank you, again, for your help and thank you, as always, for reading.

Requesting Your Help: Data Sources on Wine, Food and Tourism

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“How can data help us increase wine and food tourism?”

That’s the question I’ve been asked to address in a month’s time, during the keynote address at the Business of Wine and Food Tourism conference in Cape Town, South Africa.  

My first (admittedly selfish) reaction: Cape Town! Cape Town!

[ahem]

My second (significantly more rational) reaction: That’s actually three questions rolled into one.

  1. How can data about wine help?

  2. How can data about food help?

  3. How can data about tourism help?

What I especially love about the “three in one” factor is that it reflects the true definition of a big data company: to aggregate multiple sources of data across multiple platforms.

In other words, pulling together data about wine + food + tourism is what our team of analysts is specifically skilled at doing.

So yes, we’ve got sources about wine consumers that we can pull from, that they’re already used to dealing with. The data has to do with behavior, and location, and sentiment, and frequency.

And yes, thanks to new friends and local partners, we’ve got additional data about things like hotel/occupancy figures, air arrivals and social media reach.

Which is all good, and really exciting.

But we know there’s more, particularly when we think about the second part of the request for the keynote content: What can South Africa learn from California, particularly as it relates to the tourism industry recovering from a natural disaster?

In California, it was last year’s wildfires and the drought before that. In South Africa, it’s their drought also and reports of a water shortage that has crippled tourism efforts and reservations.

Plenty of similarities, and lots of lessons to be learned.

Here’s my question for you, and our request for your help:

What sources of data do you know, who could contribute to our analysis? Where, in California or elsewhere, can we turn for quantifiable “lessons learned” that are helpful and worth sharing?

We’re open to suggestions, and I’d love to feature the knowledge of these sources in my talk.

Here’s my cell phone number and email: +1.702.528.3717 and cathy@enolytics.com, and I’ll actually be in Sonoma this weekend, all the way until Tuesday, in case you’re local and would like to meet up in person to talk.

Thank you in advance for your help.