data

The Biggest Surprise So Far, About Wine + Data? Walk Before You Run

Photo Credit: EverydayDevotions.com

Photo Credit: EverydayDevotions.com

During our Enolytics retreat a few weeks ago, I asked our co-founder (whose professional experience is not in the wine industry) what the biggest surprise for him has been, since we launched a little more than three years ago.

“At first, the splash we made was about building an ecosystem of data partners who could help fill in the ‘blindspot’ of consumer sentiment around wine,” he said. “That’s still really important, and getting more so every day.”

And since then?

“Since then, what’s surprised me the most,” he said, “was how many wineries have said, ‘Look, we already HAVE data. We already own it, and we’re pretty sure we aren’t using it as best we can. It maybe isn’t as sexy or as splashy, but why don’t we work with that, before we bring in outside data?’”

In other words, let’s walk before we run.

Makes sense to us.

So, what kind of data do most wineries already have?

It depends on the size and nature of the business, but most often it involves DTC sales, tasting room visits, Nielsen data, CRM data, social media analytics, financial history, purchase history, or some combination of any of those.

(Can you relate to this?)

It adds up to quite a lot, actually, with the potential of something very powerful and strategic.

The catch, as maybe you can also relate to, is how few wineries dedicate staff and resources to working with the data that a wine business already has, that they generate organically every month or every quarter or etc of the year.

That’s where we can help. That’s where we’ve been helping, as much as this segment of the industry has been a surprise development for us. We’ve caught on pretty quickly.

Where are you in the process? Do you have a handle on how much data you have? Do you analyze it, and put it to work for your business? Is it helping to increase sales and improve your bottom line? Do you have a hunch it can be better?

Let’s talk about it, and see if there’s a way we can help. Please be in touch with any questions or ideas.

PS We’ll be taking next week off, enjoying the last official weekend of the summer. I hope you do too!

Thank you, as always, for reading –

Cathy

Enolytics Capabilities Deck: Revised Version, Available Now

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Improvisation.

That’s been on my mind this week for two reasons, namely updating the Enolytics capabilities deck, and as an article topic for my column over on Inc.com.

Here’s what both projects have in common: the end result was unknown at the start. That’s where improvisation comes in.

It isn’t that we didn’t know where we wanted to go. It’s more that we needed constructive input from you in the industry, plus creative collaboration, to get us there.

Because let me tell you, in the case of our capabilities deck, it is not today what it was two years ago. Not even close.

It’s better, meaning more reflective of what our industry needs and is willing to bear.

Interested in seeing it? Please let me know. I’d love to share, and talk about the ways we can make a difference for your business.

Thank you, as always, for your continued interest and encouragement.

Cathy

Holy Bloody Moly: A Piece of Good News Out of London

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We heard some incredibly exciting news this week. The shortlist was announced from London for the Louis Roederer International Wine Writers’ Awards, and I found myself as a finalist for the Mazzei International Wine Columnist of the Year.

As I wrote in my posts on social media, holy bloody moly.

It’s an honor. Full stop.

It’s also an opportunity to become familiar with the work of other writers who have been shortlisted, some of which I hadn’t previously known.

Most of all, it’s given us at Enolytics a chance to take a step back and seek perspective. In terms of the current state of content we care about it, that is, and the future of it as well.

That will be on our minds this coming week as our team begins our annual retreat: to seek perspective on the evolution of wine + data, and the future of it as well, for Enolytics and in general.

I’m looking forward to the pause away from our regular routines, to the brainstorming, and especially to strategizing about how to do better in the months and years to come.

Thank you, as always, for your input and for reading these weekly posts.

The Content-Data-Content Sandwich, and Why It Matters for Wine

Source: BBC Good Food

Source: BBC Good Food

Not sure if you’ve noticed, but there have been some really exciting moves within the industry lately when it comes to data.

Interestingly, each move in data has also involved a move in content.

I’ve written about the merger a few months ago of the Global Wine Database with Wine Folly, to create Folly Enterprises; Wine Folly’s most recent accolade came from the James Beard Foundation, which named Madeline Puckette and Justin Hammack’s Wine Folly: Magnum Edition the best Beverage book of 2019. And this week, we learned about the strategic alliance between Beverage Media Group and SevenFifty Technologies, the parent of SevenFifty Daily which was named this past week as the Best Cocktail and Spirits publication by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation.

Could you have data without having content?

Of course you can. But that’s when data mostly performs in a vacuum, when it’s able to be understood by only so many people. It’s the context, which the content provides, that gives the data “legs,” so to speak, that propels someone to get up out of their chair and run down the hall to their manager’s office to try to convince them to make a change to how they do business.

In the day-to-day operations of Enolytics, it looks like this:

Content – Data – Content

First we understand the need, which means the content around the client’s pain point when it comes to data.

Then we work with the raw data, from various sources, in order to address that need and offer potential solutions.

Finally, we circle back to content, which means interpreting the solutions so that the data-based results actually mean something to the client in actionable ways.

The data is the meat of this sandwich, no doubt about it. But it’s also the content on either side of it that makes it palatable. We see it every day at the office, and we see it happening around us too, at various levels throughout the industry.

Please let us know if you’d like to join the flow, and how we can help.

Thank you, as always, for reading.

This Week’s Very Big News About Wine + Data, and Why You Should Care

Left to right: Matthew Protti (CEO – BlackSquare), Madeline Puckette (Co-Founder – Folly Enterprises), Ben Andrews (Co-Founder – Folly Enterprises), David Gluzman (CEO – Folly Enterprises)

Left to right: Matthew Protti (CEO – BlackSquare), Madeline Puckette (Co-Founder – Folly Enterprises), Ben Andrews (Co-Founder – Folly Enterprises), David Gluzman (CEO – Folly Enterprises)

Let me approach this week’s post the way an old-school journalist would, with the who-what-where-when-why.

WHO: The Global Wine Database (GWDB) and Wine Folly, in particular David Gluzman and Madeline Puckette, respectively.

WHAT: The two businesses are merging.

WHERE: Geographically, GWDB is in Calgary, Wine Folly is in Seattle.

WHEN: The merger was announced officially last week, on April 3.

WHY (a.k.a., the best part): To design the interface for the human experience of wine information.

Let’s pause for a moment right here.

“To design the interface for the human experience of wine information.”

As you no doubt know, there is an endless stream of wine information being generated every moment of every day. The fact that businesses in the industry don’t do such a great job yet with all of that information is a big reason why Enolytics exists.

GWDB knows this too, especially since they’re the ones who have set themselves the Herculean goal of collecting accurate data about the world’s wines all under one roof.

Wine Folly definitely knows this, since Puckette has long been a thought leader on compelling, visually engaging infographics about the world of wine. During Vinitaly just this past week, in fact, she was recognized for this work by winning the IWSC Wine Communicator of the Year award.

So, we have on our hands a very significant coming together for anyone who cares about wine + data, as I assume you do.

On one hand, accurate technical data about wine.

On the other hand, great visual storytelling of that data that will boost the human experience of wine out of the spreadsheets that have held it captive for so long.

It’s just as the motto for the new Folly Enterprises states: Engaging, informative and accurate wine information for the world.

Right??

At Enolytics, we couldn’t be more enthusiastic about the news of this merger. It’s good news, for all of us who care about business intelligence, compelling narratives, and accurate data – all in service of the human experience of wine.

Please reach out with any questions or comments, and thank you as always for reading.

Cathy

Enolytics is Shortlisted in the Born Digital Wine Awards’ Innovation Category

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So yeah. We’re pretty stoked about it.

Partly that’s because being shortlisted for the Born Digital Wine Awards’ (BDWA) Innovation category positions Enolytics alongside some of the people we respect most in the industry. (Please read the full announcement here.) We respect these colleagues because they stick their neck out, and because of their belief that the wine industry can keep doing better, even when that belief isn’t always the most popular one.

We believe that too: that the wine industry can keep doing better. In fact that’s how we answered one of the questions in Round Two of the BDWA selection process. The question was, “What does winning the Innovation award mean to you?”

It’s a vote for collaboration in the wine world, we replied.

It’s a validation of an idea, and an endorsement of an effort to push the envelope.

Even moreso, though, was this second part of our answer that had to do with motivation, and our “why”:

We are motivated internally. We are determined for Enolytics to add value to the industry, and we will continue on that path whether or not we receive external validation.

Please don’t get me wrong. We are grateful, deeply and sincerely, for the external validation and recognition of our work. And it will help, without a doubt. In fact it already has.

We’re just saying that we’d do the work anyway.

Because it matters, and we’re stoked most of all to be able to keep doing it.

THANK YOU.

Happily, we’d also like to highlight two additional developments related to the BDWA news:

  1. A Balanced Glass, founded by Rebecca Hopkins, has also been shortlisted for the Innovation Award. The ABG community of wine professionals prioritizes wellness and balance in our lives, and I’m proud to say that I contribute content to the site every other week. Two other nominees for the Innovation Award, Robert Hopkins and Stevie Kim at Wine2Wine, have also encouraged and supported Enolytics in various capacities.

  2. My article on Forbes.com that featured fellow wine writer Julia Coney was shortlisted in the Best Interview category: “It’s Like Mansplaining, but for Race”: What the Wine Industry Can Learn about Black Consumers. The article was about Julia, but it’s really about how she pushes the envelope too.

Please have a look at all the BDWA news here.

Thank you, again –

Cathy

The Roller Coaster Ride That Is Enolytics: Ups, Downs, Tipping Points, and Loop the Loops

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Before we launched Enolytics, many of you were familiar with my writing on wine for Forbes online. Contributing to Forbes was a boon to my career as a writer, as it enabled me to explore the wine industry and to study the nuances of its business from the inside out. Since my particular “beat” in the column was technology, it was during this time that the kernel of the idea for Enolytics began to take shape.

Once we launched in 2016, my editors at Forbes halted my writing about technology and, though I am still an enthusiastic contributor at Forbes on other areas of the wine business, I also began writing for Inc online about entrepreneurship, particularly in the wine and hospitality space. The Inc platform, too, has opened exceptional opportunities for exploring the nuances of business, this time through the entrepreneurial lens.

An article I posted this week outlines a pivotal moment along the entrepreneurial journey of Enolytics: when to decide to scale the business. You are welcome to read the original post over on Inc.com but here are the key takeaways for anyone who’s experienced the vertigo of the roller coaster ride that is the startup world.

  • We knew what Enolytics’ initial offering was but we also knew that, since data analysis was (and is) still a new concept for the wine industry, we'd have to be nimble and responsive to the needs that were being expressed. This meant a lot of listening and, for the sake of our bottom line, even more understanding of how to scale what seemed at first to be one-off or custom projects.

  • It isn't easy. There are projects we're managing now that frankly we couldn't have anticipated when we launched, and were not even on our radar during the writing of our business plan.

  • There was no way we could have anticipated the particular development of Enolytics Spain, because we couldn't have predicted that there was a data group in Madrid who had been planning to do very much the same thing. There was no way to know, until we launched and the idea was "out there."

  • Shortly after Andrés Bonet contacted me about a satellite office in Madrid, where he lives, he drove to Bordeaux to meet me; I'd been teaching at a university there that week. We sat and talked on the edge of a fish market, with a few burly and very vocal fishmongers in the background, in the midst of a bustling Saturday morning market in November.

  • The business is data is transacted in zeroes and ones, of course, but face-to-face was where the business of our partnership was transacted. (Accompanied by the soundtrack of fishmongers throwing fish.)

The essence of entrepreneurship is putting a new idea out there. Something, probably many things, are bound to go wrong. But it's what you'll learn along the way that make launching the idea — and its subsequent iterations — worth doing.

How Any of Us Can Start the Wine + Data Analysis Journey, for Free

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Last week Cathy wrote about the Qlik Continuing Classroom, and how she’s introducing it for the first time to MBA students she’s teaching in Bordeaux. For one year, at no cost to them, students can access the Qlik platform and its educational resources, and even become a certified practitioner of the technology.

This week I wanted to step in and talk to a different audience – to the people in our community who aren’t currently students – about the same message: How to access free tools that jumpstart the data journey.

Because we believe in empowering wine businesses of all sizes to do something with their data.

We believe that the more people we can educate about the power of data-driven visualizations for business intelligence, the more it will elevate the industry as a whole.

We believe that data is for everybody, whether you’re a student and just starting out, or you’re wanting to add a new and valuable skill, or you’re an experienced professional looking for a new challenge that will add value and interest to your work.

As the co-founder and COO of Enolytics, I’m going to do something I probably shouldn’t be doing, and that’s to tell you that “doing something with your data” doesn’t necessarily mean hiring Enolytics.

Many of you are already perfectly capable of mining and visualizing your own data. You just need some help getting started.

Which brings me to why I’m writing Enolytics 101 this week.

I want you to know that there are a lot of resources that take the mystery out of data.

Most of you use Excel for handling your data but, in our opinion, Excel lacks the ability to dynamically visualize your data in the most useful and effective ways. Yes, you can make charts! But they are static. When you have additional questions, you need to create another table and another chart. That’s possible, but very time consuming.

So how do you get started? Without spending any money, the way the students have the opportunity to do? How do you start viewing your data in a way that enables you to make meaningful business decisions?

Many Business Intelligence vendors (like Qlik, Tableau, Microsoft PowerBI, etc.) offer free desktop versions of their products. It gives you a good start as you can basically do all functions on your own computer.

Check out:

  • Qlik. This is a desktop version of Qlik Sense (for Windows Users) that is free for personal and internal business use. It is also our recommendation. If you have a Mac, we suggest you install Parallels or VMWare so you can run it in a Windows environment. You can also use the Cloud version, QlikSense Cloud for free. Cloud has somewhat more limited functionality (probably still more than what you would normally need) but it will allow you to share with up to five users, and it can also run on moblie devices. You are, however, limited in the size of data files you upload. Remember to use Youtube as a resource to learn all about how to use it. There are plenty of tutorials.

  • Tableau. You’re limited by the amount of rows, and you can only connect Excel or text files. Also, and this is important, anything you save in Tableau Public will be saved on the Tableau Public Sever, which anyone can download. So there is no confidentiality there. Tableau is a great visualization platform but we wouldn’t recommend the free version for the reasons just mentioned.

  • Power BI. This is definitely an up-and-coming platform with beautiful visualization options. There’s also plenty of information about it available on YouTube and throughout the internet to get you going. It’s also fairly easy to use and has a free version (like Qlik Sense).

If you have a bit of computer savvy and you’d like to give data management and visualization a shot, these should be a good start for you.

If there’s enough interest, Enolytics would be happy to host a User Group where everyone can help each other out, ask questions and suggest ideas.

At a certain point father into the journey, yes, it will probably make sense to bring in data scientists with more experience and deeper expertise. And we hope at that point you’ll consider hiring Enolytics, whether you want to incorporate external data or build something with more moving parts. Until then, there’s a whole lot of ground you can cover on your own.

Tell us what you think. We’re listening, and encouraging the journey.

We never wanted Enolytics to be just another for-profit company in the wine industry. We know the power of data, and how it can be put to use for good. If “for good” in this case means empowering the wine community to work smarter and more efficiently, we want to help.

Thank you,

Chris

Letter from the COO: How Data Can Help You Reach Your Company Goals in 2019

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Note: This week, as we flip the calendar page to 2019, I’ve asked Enolytics’ Chief Operating Officer to write about best practices for using data to achieve your yearly goals. True to form, being a COO and all, his thoughts went right to strategic planning for the fiscal year. Here are his thoughts, which are most relevant to colleagues whose roles are also operational in nature. But if you’re reading this, I’m sure you’ll be able to pull out what matters for you.

If your business’ fiscal year matches your calendar year, it’s the perfect opportunity to talk about strategic planning to meet your goals. Whether they’re financial goals (sales), operational goals (production and delivery) or human resources related goals (hiring or education), an action plan at this point is your best friend for the bottom line.

An action plan involves tracking your performance objectively. Here are a few questions to ask yourself, to start.

  • What are my Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)?

  • How do I create a scorecard?

  • How often should I look at it? Every quarter? Every month? In real time?

  • What are my comparison KPIs? Month to budget? Month to Previous Year Month? Rolling 12 month?

Let’s say that the number of cases you’re shipping is off somehow. It’s a good indicator, but how do you pinpoint the reason why that particular KPI is off? It could take you weeks to find the culprit, especially if you have hundreds or thousands of accounts you’re tracking. But you should be able to figure this out real time. When you identify underperforming accounts in real time, then you can create corrective action to turn them around quickly and effectively.

To be able to do that, a few things need to happen. We can help with each of these points.

  • Make the data clean and dependable.

  • Visualize your data.

  • Understand what it’s telling you.

  • Deliver the intelligence you need, when you need it.

Objective data will tell you if you’re reaching your company goals or not. If you aren’t reaching your goals, the data will tell you which areas require more focus.

A new year is a great opportunity to change things up a bit. If you haven’t been tracking your performance, I encourage you to start now. It’s the backbone of many successful enterprises.

All of us at Enolytics wish you a healthy and successful 2019!

Thank you,

Chris

The Cultural Code of Data for Wine, All Around the World

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How many frequent flier miles does it take to do data + wine?

That’s a rhetorical question (obviously) but one that’s crossed my mind a few times these past months. I love to travel and recently my journeys have involved speaking with wineries and organizations about their data.

What I’ve noticed is how closely their questions about data reflect the more global questions and concerns that are currently impacting their commercial interests.

It’s an alignment of micro and macro if there ever was one.

This week I’d like to take a moment to share a sampling of the questions we’re hearing from all around the world, along with the bigger-issue "why" concerns that go along with them.

Chile

Data Question: Behavior and sentiment patterns of consumers in Asia

Why: China and Japan have quickly emerged as priority markets for Chilean producers, thanks in no small part to favorable trade agreements negotiated by their government.

South Africa

Data Question: Viticultural, particularly around the terroirs of their older vines

Why: Interest in South African old vines has been surging as awareness of their unique history and value becomes better studied and understood.

California

Data Question: Packaging and visualizing the DTC data that wineries already have

Why: Profit margins are higher when wine is sold DTC.

México

Data Question: County-specific consumption and sentiment patterns, especially of their own wines in relation to foreign wines

Why: Renewed interest in the domestic market, and refreshed pride of ownership of domestic wineries.

Spain and the US

Data Question: Consumption and sentiment patterns around spirits and craft beer, respectively

Why: Data is data, and consumers are consumers. The way we work with wine data is transferrable to the way we work with spirits and beer data as well.

It’s an incredibly exciting moment. As I’ve written before, Enolytics now is not what we thought Enolytics would be, even six months ago. That’s because the conversation keeps evolving, as we continue to build out proofs of concept that demonstrate the value of working with data.

It’s also because this community has IDEAS. Lots of them.

Thank you for that.

Please let me know if something here strikes a chord and you’d like to talk. I’m listening.

— Cathy

PS To everyone in the US who will be celebrating the holiday next week, Happy Thanksgiving! We'll see you back here in two weeks, on Friday, November 30, for the last few posts of 2018.

The Ace Up Our Sleeve, and How We Put It into Play

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The ace up Enolytics’ sleeve is, without a doubt, our team of data scientists.

What makes them so special?

Two things.

First is their professional history of working with data, which amounts to 50+ years of experience.

Second is that this experience happened far from the wine world, in healthcare, in fact, which is significantly farther along the data journey than the wine industry has been so far. It’s a difference of tools and skillset, and mining the data for business intelligence.

Data is data, and analytics are analytics. But how, exactly, does experience in healthcare transfer over to the wine industry?

That was a question we heard this past week, and I thought it would be useful to share the answer, straight from our data team.

Let’s say I was diagnosed with breast cancer, and the doctors choose one of five treatment options.

That has an okay chance of working.

But let’s say we use factors like my genetic makeup and medical history. That will allow the medical team to assign me to a cohort of similar patients who had treatments in the past and therefore can predict which treatments have a higher change of success.

In other words, it allows analysts to personalize the treatment much more narrowly, to my individual situation.

Does that make sense?

It’s no longer a one size fits all solution, and my chances of recovery increase significantly.

So what are the parallels to wine?

No consumer is the same, and no vineyard or winery is the same, the way that no patient in a healthcare situation is the same. We all have variables that are individual to us.

It means that the experience and communication – in the hospital, and around wine – can be personalized and customized.

That’s what data does, and that’s what our team knows to do best.

Please let me know if we can help you, and your data.

Thank you, as always, for reading.

When a Millennial Gets the Wine Data Bug AND Has Chutzpah? It's a Win for Wine.

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Millennials.

Everyone in the wine industry is chasing them as consumers. Personally, I’m interested in them as “who’s next” for wine + data.

They’ve got ideas.

They’ve got fresh perspective.

They don’t feel tied — or obliged — to how things have always been done.

Fortunately, through my teaching gigs at universities and MBA students around the world, I get to meet these people and hear those ideas. Even more fortunately, millennials outside those formal programs sometimes reach out directly to talk about wine + data.

That’s when I get to add chutzpah to their list of qualifications.

This week, we’re shining the spotlight onto a millennial-with-chutzpah-who-also-does-wine-and-data. Her name is Gianna DiGiovanni, she’s worked in both Napa and Italy, and she’s in her senior year at the University of Southern California with a dual focus on Business and Applied Analytics.

She’s my kind of millennial. And I’ve invited her to be the second feature in our Derek Jeter-inspired series that puts the storytelling of wine + data into the hands of people who actually live it. (The first one, two weeks ago, was Randy Browne at C. Mondavi & Family.)

Here’s the story, about wine + data + millennials, in Gianna’s own words.

What's interesting to you about data, and about data for the wine industry?

I have always been fascinated with numbers and patterns, so naturally, data and the whole idea of big data in business caught my attention. I was able to act on this passion of mine when I started as a freshman at the University of Southern California in 2015, studying Business Administration. During my sophomore year, I enrolled in my first analytics course. I fell in love immediately. 

My interest in the wine industry is another story that I believe is attributed to my upbringing. My dad is a farmer and my childhood was surrounded by almonds, walnuts, sweet potatoes and peaches. Growing up, the importance of agriculture and knowing where your food came from was inherent. Everyone I knew either was a farmer or had a farmer in their family. It wasn't until coming to college that I learned how rare my situation was. Not everyone understands the importance of the agricultural industry, and most take it for granted. I believe it is my understanding of how much work is put into harvesting a crop, like grapes, that truly makes me appreciate a product like wine. 

What I have learned from my fascination with the wine industry and data is that there is a huge disconnect between the two. Unlike most industries that have already begun to integrate big data into their operations, the wine industry has yet to do so. I have made it my mission to make up for this lag. By marrying the two together, wine and data, the industry can make a tremendous leap into a new age in wine, one where wineries can better understand their consumer and better distribute their product. 

How are you learning the skills you think you'll need for a career in this area?

I am extremely fortunate to be in school, pursuing my minor while the world is making the shift to big data. I have been able to learn from some of the best professors in the field of data analysis and work hands-on with data from actual companies like Yelp and Sams Club. My toolkit of skills has grown with each application and new software that I am taught. 

I have also been able to add skills and experiences to my toolkit outside of school. Over the past two summers I have worked in Italy and the Napa Valley, becoming more knowledgeable about the wine industry and the customers, market, and product that it's comprised of. 

My hope is that by having an understanding of the industry and the skills to manipulate the data, I will graduate with a well-established toolkit that will help me get to where I want to go, professionally. 

What are the biggest challenges you face now, or you will face in the coming years, working with data in wine?

Changing a centuries-old industry to adapt to the modern world is a challenge in itself. This is something that all those interested in analyzing data in wine face. For me, this has meant the job that I hope to one day have doesn't yet exist. I cannot simply learn from those who have paved the road ahead of me, I have to seek people out from all over. 

The challenge to pursue a career path that is oddly specific and that doesn't already exist, keeps things interesting. 

I’ve learned that no matter the industry, making sense of the data available is the key to gaining beneficial insight. I plan to learn from those who are already making sense of their data, so that when the time comes and wineries are ready to make the leap into the world of big data, I will be prepared with the tools necessary to help them succeed.

Wine + Data, and a Letter from Mexico: How to See What’s Possible, and Run With it

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This week I’ve been enjoying my first-ever trip to Mexico (not sure how it’s “first-ever” but that’s probably a story for another time) and I’ve picked up a few things about the wine industry here.

  • There are a heck of a lot of sommeliers in Mexico City. Their popularity and enthusiasm reflect the spiking consumer interest here in wine, and in Mexican wine in particular.
  • A state called Querétaro, in central Mexico and about a two-hour drive from Mexico City, is fostering a rapidly-expanding wine and food tourism sector. Hand-in-hand with that is an influx of significant foreign investment, which helps to build technologically sophisticated wineries and tasting rooms and adjacent restaurants and cafés.
  • 96% of the 2.1 million cases of wine produced here are consumed here.
  • Mexican wine accounts for 40 to 45% of all wine consumed in Mexico, and the market is seeing an annual growth rate of 10 to 11%.

Right.

Tomorrow, as part of the México Selection program organized by Concours Mondial de Bruxelles, I’ve been asked to introduce Enolytics and what data analysis can mean in the context of those bullet points, above.

I honestly cannot wait, partly to share some of the insights that have already risen to the surface about wine consumers in Mexico (indirectly even, in the course of other projects) and partly to hear how the audience here receives these insights.

Once we show what’s possible, how do they take the ball and run with it?

If we can locate digital consumer sentiment within the neighborhood of specific restaurants (and we can), how does that help that young, savvy cadre of sommeliers, in Mexico City and elsewhere?

If we can segment consumer sentiment around Spanish wine, relative to French wine, relative to Mexican wine, and then track the trends of that sentiment over time (which is all possible), how does this empower the emerging Mexican wine industry?

If we can take data that’s specific to wine consumers, and then overlay that with data from the tourism sector, how does that help direct valuable resources and communications so that eno- and gastro-tourism continues to thrive?

We dunno. Yet.

But boy are they – are we – hungry to find out.

Let me toss the question to you.

Once you see what’s possible, how will you take the ball and run with it?

I’d love to hear.

Thank you for reading and thank you, as always, for sharing this journey with me.

Cathy

I'm Not Sure If You've Heard... But You'll Want To

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I'm not sure if you've heard...

But there's been some really cool -- and, to me, inspiring -- amount of information buzzing around about data for the wine industry.

This week I'd like to turn your attention to articles and posts that have particularly caught my attention, because they've been generated from within this community of people who are interested and engaged in the topic of wine and data.

If you're reading this, you're part of the community too.

If you haven't seen these posts, or if these companies aren't yet on your radar for their work, I hope they will be. Because they're contributing and thinking and sharing valuable insights, for the betterment of the industry.

That's why I'm inspired. I hope you will be too.

[Sidebar: We’re hitting the road this weekend, and looking forward very much to participating in the Fine Minds 4 Fine Wine conference in Champagne, France. For those of you in the US, enjoy your Fourth of July celebrations! We’ll see you back here in two weeks.]

Source: 3x3 Insights

Article: Five Ways Liquor Retailers Can Start Using Analytics Today

Source: Quini

Article: Georgetown University Executive MBA Cohort Taps Quini Platform for Wine Big Data Research Project

Source: The-Buyer.net

Article: How FMGG consumer insights are giving Concha y Toro the edge

Source: C Mondavi and Family

Article: Job Posting: Sales Data Analyst

Source: Wine Business Monthly

Article: Data Consortium Demonstrates Power of Big Data for Unlocking DTC Potential, Boosting Sales

What other posts and resources have you seen lately? I'd love to hear.

Thank you, as always, for reading –

Cathy

How to Treat Your Millennial Customers Differently

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Do you treat the millennial customers in your DTC program differently than, say, your baby boomers?

Do you segment them by gender and location?

Have you identified spend patterns and varietal preferences, in order to customize your offerings to best suit their profile?

I'll be totally psyched for you if you do.

It would be an excellent application of analyzing data that you already own, and you'd be a few steps ahead of some wineries we've been talking to these past few weeks.

You'd also be in the minority, in terms of maximizing your own data and in terms of communicating with millennials.

How to do both of those things are questions that have come up for Enolytics again and again. We're gaining traction when it comes to helping wineries more strategically utilize their customer data (including data about millennials) and this week I'd like to share some strategies about the second question.

How can we do a better job of reaching millennial wine consumers? And how can we sell them more wine?

For a perspective on this, I'd like to welcome a guest contributor to Enolytics 101. Olivia Schonewise, a colleague and friend who I've come to know in the past year or so, piqued my interest because of her experience and intelligence, and also for her candor about the wine industry's lag in reaching the millennial demographic of which she is a part.

I invited Olivia to speak to what we're doing wrong and, more importantly, how we can do better. Here are four things she'd like us all to know, followed by her ten suggestions that wineries can execute straight away.

Here she is.

* * *

What the Wine Industry Needs to Hear about Millennial Consumers

  1. The wine industry doesn't understand consumers in their 20's, which is amusing because we are literally the most transparent generation of people in history.
  2. There are lots of questions being asked about millennials, like who we are, what we want, and how to get us to buy wine. There aren't a lot of good answers yet, probably because the people trying to answer the questions are not, in fact, millennials.
  3. Wine brands are not meeting millennial consumers where we are. That, in a nutshell, is the disconnect between millennials and the wine industry.
  4. If you’re unsure of where to start, think like a millennial. Or better yet, hire a millennial. No one understands millennials better than millennials themselves.

What Wine Brands Can Do Right Now

  1. Meet us on the interfaces and platforms we're using, not the ones that the wine industry has used in the past.
  2. This means Instagram.
  3. It also means lifestyle websites. (See numbers 8 to 10, below.)
  4. Instagram again: The wine industry prides itself on creating products with stories and connections that feel very personal to consumers. Instagram allows wineries to communicate directly with the people who buy and consume their products, and that’s about as personal as it gets.
  5. I genuinely believe that Instagram is the most untapped marketing resource of the wine industry, and the lack of brands who are active on it is astonishing. There are over 800 million active Instagram users, and more than 50% of them are millennials (aged 22 to 37).
  6. You don't have to have a huge budget. You just have to be present.
  7. Post, comment and engage daily. Give your customers a platform to learn more about your products while creating a community.
  8. LIfestyle websites are like our modern day newspapers and magazines. These include Brit + Co, BuzzFeed, Popsugar, Mashable, Business Insider, Refinery29 and many more. This is where millennials stay up to date on world events, learn about new products, discover trends, and share information. It’s how we digitally "hang out."
  9. Meet us there.
  10. Get your brands on these platforms. Send samples to the teams at Vinepair and Bustle. Pay for an advertisement on Thrillist. Have Elite Daily do a write up on you. Take out ads in Cosmopolitan, GQ or Vogue instead of the usual wine print outlets.

Looking forward to seeing you out there,

Olivia Schonewise

----

Contact Information:

Cathy Huyghe, Co-Founder of Enolytics

Phone: +1.702.528.3717 | cathy@enolytics.com | www.enolytics.com

Dry Creek Vineyard, an Enolytics' Early Adopter, Featured in Wines & Vines

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Early adopters.

They're some of the most important "assets" that a new venture can have.

They're the people who *get* what you're trying to do before anyone else does.

They're the ones who are willing to say, We don't exactly know how this is going to help, but we want to figure it out.

They're also the ones who are willing to speak up, who have the temerity to raise their hand first and say that there's value in the new idea.

Dry Creek Vineyard, and especially Michael Longerbeam, their DTC Manager, have been all of those things for us, almost from the very beginning of Enolytics two years ago.

Michael and his work at Dry Creek are featured this month in Wines & Vines magazine, in an article by Andy Starr called "How Wineries Take Advantage of Big Data," and we couldn't be happier to see him getting the recognition he deserves. (Screenshot from the online version is above.)

Enolytics is in the article too, in the context of providing something that every winery should have: a breakout of their wine portfolio by margin and volume, displayed in an easy-to-understand graphic.

It's what Michael first asked us to do with Dry Creek's data, and it's been a cornerstone of our work ever since. Please let us know if we can do the same for you.

Thank you, Michael. Thank you, Dry Creek Vineyard. Thank you, Andy Starr and Wines & Vines.

We're psyched to keep the momentum flowing.

Wine Data to Move You from Traditional to Intelligence-Based Organization

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Today I’d like to put Quini on your wine data radar.

It may not be on your radar yet, mainly because it’s based in British Columbia.

But here’s what’s important for the audience of this Enolytics 101 series to know about Quini: they use real-time data, in the form of wine consumer sensory and attitudinal feedback, to deliver personalized and actionable insights that a retailer, wine producer or large restaurant company can use immediately.

Here’s how it works. I’ll use the retail sales environment as an example.

  1. Introduction: A store offers their customers a smart, fast way to search for wine they will likely enjoy, on their website or in store on the customer’s smartphone, powered by Quini.
  2. Execution: Customers provide feedback on the Quini app about the wines they taste, whether at in-person tastings, at home, virtual wine club events or any other opportunity.
  3. Backend: The app records between 30 and 40 data points about any given wine, about descriptors like aromas and tannins but also about variables such as expectations and likeability.
  4. Bonus: Staff can also input their own feedback about the wine, as well as food pairings and other notes that are unique to the store.

The retailer is able to see that feedback in real time. Which means that the retailer can pull up the customer’s profile – while they’re standing in the store or when the retailer is putting together their next wine club shipment – and see that, for example, the customer has tried a few chardonnays that don’t seem to be jiving with their palate.

The retailer can then recommend different wines that steer away from what the customer didn’t like about the chardonnays, and focus more on specific wine, categories and types they did enjoy.

On their dashboard, the retailer can also spot wines the customer may have tried somewhere else and take action to be first in the area to bring it in – or offer to the customer a similar wine.

In a nutshell, retailers can automate their ability to service their customers like never before, using data.

“This helps to go from being a traditional retailer to a more intelligence-based organization,” said Roger Noujeim, CEO of Quini.

That’s why Quini is now on your radar.

Note: They’re based in British Columbia but the platform is usable in the US and worldwide, in winery, retail and restaurant environments.

Why am I telling you about this?

  1. Because it's way cool for anyone interested in wine and data. 
  2. Because we respect its technology and execution.
  3. Because it's powerful enough on its own, which also makes it exceptionally helpful as a data partner in our ecosystem, particularly when aggregated with complementary sources.

Please be in touch with any comments or ideas, and thank you, as always, for reading.

ProWein through the Eyes of Enolytics Spain: A Letter from Düsseldorf

Photo Credit: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Photo Credit: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Special Guest Post by Andrés Bonet-Merten, Consejero Delegado of Enolytics Spain


The most significant takeaway for Enolytics Spain from ProWein 2018 is this:

I see a great future for the Spanish wine business’ use of big data analysis to address our issues in market communication, marketing their wine, and taking advantage of the tools offered by new technologies. Early adopters will lead the change – that is without a doubt – and government agencies will lead the transformation of reluctant producers and organizations with research and development programs.

There were three occasions during ProWein when this became clear.

ICEX, the Spanish Government Agency of Export

In speaking with Cathy Huyghe and ICEX, I saw that ICEX has a clear understanding of what comes next for new technologies that are entering the wine business. They are aware of the significant changes of technology and the speed and capacity of new sources of big data that are being used by early adopters in Spain, in order to understand and analyze consumer sentiment, preferences and behaviour when buying wine. ICEX understands that the jump forward in market intelligence through big data analytics offered by Enolytics is significant, and that it offers a fresh perspective and alternative to traditional market studies.

CEOs and Other Executives

In speaking to CEOs and other executives who showed an open mind to our proposition, I saw that big data today is like the internet of the 1990s. They believes that data can fill a blind spot about wine consumers, which can provide them with a great competitive advantage.

The physical gap between wine producer and end consumer is enormous. After delivery of the wine to the importers in the world markets, in general, Spanish wineries lose control and insight of how, where and at which price their wine is marketed. Enolytics may put light there and deliver valuable information to the winery and the distribution network that will compel better communication between the wineries and their importers and distribution network. Filling this lack of communication could optimize the business of all the parties involved, using a win-win strategy and providing greater control of the commercialization of their wine in any market. 

Discussing Consumer Language

Another blindspot for wineries is the use of consumer language. Little attention has been given to how consumers themselves actually speak – what they would really like to read on the back labels, for example, what mottos would be appealing to consumers, which words consumers use to describe their wine or their competitors’ wines. Messages are sent only in one way, from the winery to the markets, but it is rare to follow serious analysis of consumer feedback or the specific wine language that is used.

Some Spanish wineries have realized that “being the best wine” isn’t enough of a value proposition to differentiate themselves from every other Spanish winery who markets themselves as “being the best wine.” Adapting the wine's style, its brand, label, marketing and commercialization towards the consumer's sentiment and behaviour is a great turning point. Big data analysis instead would deliver them quick information, even in real time or even further as predictive analysis. 

Next Steps

Trusting new technologies like big data analysis is a hard matter in the Spanish world of wineries. Proof that it really works is a common argument. We have initial case studies, and we have early adopters. Now is the time to keep pushing forward, so that data can be an integral part of the exciting evolution of Spanish wine. 

For more information about Enolytics Spain, please contact:

www.enolytics.es    

info@enolytics.es  

LinkedIn

tel. +34 601 35 10 24

4 Takeaways from a Standing Room Only Session at Vinexpo

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Earlier this week it was my pleasure to moderate a panel during the launch of Vinexpo in New York, on the topic of millennials' purchasing power and the rise of ecommerce.

Apparently I wasn't the only one who was curious to hear what the panelists had to say -- there was standing room only, with willing attendees (not so happily) turned away, and lots of questions during the session and afterward.

It was one of those "That went well!" events, and I was psyched for the panelists to voice their perspective on the topic.

Let me bottom line the conversation for you in these few essential points:

  1. The data already exists that tells us what we need to know about millennials and ecommerce. That's because they're telling us what they want, every minute of every day, and leaving a digital trail for us to follow. Data minimizes the guesswork and the mystery of this topic. We just have to tap into it.
  2. Three of the five panelists spoke from the perspective of their own data, which they tap into, to the ultimate benefit of the consumer: Heini Zachariassen of Vivino, Lara Crystal of Minibar Delivery, and Jacob Moynihan of Merchant23.
  3. If we see the wine consumer as a puzzle, we can envision each of these data sources as a piece of the puzzle with its own unique shape. The more puzzle pieces we have, and the more of them that we put together, the more accurate the picture of the consumer is going to be.
  4. That being said, data is not a panacea. It is very powerful, but it is not a cure-all. It needs to be complemented -- it will always need to be complemented -- by human experience and input. That's where our other two panelists weighed in: Pascaline Lepeltier MS of Racine's NY and Valerie Gerard-Matsuura of Sopexa, whose deep experience in wine, and with this demographic in particular, prove to be exceptionally valuable.

Isn't it time for you to take some guesswork out of your interaction with wine consumers, whether they're millennials, on ecommerce platforms, or otherwise?

There's a world of data out there to make that happen. We can help.

Please let me know your thoughts and questions, and thank you as always for reading.

Cathy Huyghe, Co-Founder of Enolytics

Phone: +1.702.528.3717 | cathy@enolytics.com | www.enolytics.com

Wine Data, Interrupted. And a Secret.

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These past few weeks we’ve been focusing on case studies and how to visualize wine data. I sincerely appreciate your positive feedback to those, and I’m looking forward to sharing more in the weeks to come.

Today, let’s take a short breather and zoom out for a moment to the big picture of data.

It also involves telling you a bit of a secret.

The ace up Enolytics’ sleeve is, undoubtedly, our team of data scientists and analysts. My mind is blown by their skills, creativity and careful treatment of the data that we work with.

Here’s the secret: They are not wine people.

Their 50+ years of combined experience have been mainly in the healthcare space, and the work they do with wine data is integrally informed by their work in healthcare.

In other words, their skills transfer. They quickly learned the logic and flows of the industry, so they could easily frame the data in the right context.

If these skills are useful for healthcare and for wine, what else can they be used for?

That’s the question for today, and here’s part of the answer: Shortly after we launched Enolytics, with our focus on the wine industry, I was asked whether we plan to also work with data from the spirits category.

Our CTO’s response?

“Of course. Data is data.”

I was asked a similar question recently, this time on whether we planned to also work with data from the cannabis industry.

Cannabis?

Extending our work to also include spirits is something we could have anticipated. But cannabis?

Hmm.

“It sounds like Enolytics is doing similar things for the wine industry that my firm is doing for cannabis,” I read in a LinkedIn message, which also noted the growing connection between the alcohol industry and cannabis.

It’s a good point, and one worth exploring.

Data is data, and it’s informing the direction of businesses in many categories.

Like wine.

How can we put our skills to use for you? We're open to ideas, especially those that make us go, Hmm.

I look forward to hearing from you, and thanks.